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News About Lincoln

A collection of stories that owners should hear about including recalls, lawsuits, investigations, and top complaints. Like many automakers, Lincoln has been in the news for dangerous Takata airbag recalls.

Ford to NHTSA: We Don't Wanna Recall 2.7 Million More Takata Inflators

[Ford and Mazda] have petitioned the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) to be exempted from the Takata recall. Unlike the tens of millions of airbag inflators already recalled in millions of vehicles, the 2.7 million inflators have a drying agent (desiccant) called calcium sulfate used to protect the explosive chemical, ammonium nitrate, from moisture.

Takata initially thought these inflators were safe, but further testing revealed problems. Given the dangers Nissan did the smart thing and accepted the recall right away. Ford, meanwhile, wants more even more testing. That means owners of the 1st generation Milan are their crash dummies.

MKX and Continental Recalled for Takata Airbags, But It’s Not What You Think.

These days you never want to hear that your car has been recalled because of a defective Takata airbag, what with their explosive, shrapnel-hurling nature and all. So when Ford announced that the 2nd generation MKX and all-new 10th generation Continental, owners had every right to be concerned.

Well, breathe easy. Sort of.

While the majority of Takata problems are about their airbags inflating with too much force, this one is about them inflating with too little. According to Ford, it’s due to a misalignment of components inside the airbag moodule.

This is still a dangerous problem, just not neccessarily as explosive. The affected cars include the 2016-17 MKX and 2017 Contintental.

Ford Expands a Recall of Lincoln Vehicles with Takata Airbags

Ford is recalling more than 816,000 Ford, Lincoln and Mercury vehicles to replace passenger-side frontal Takata airbag inflators as part of a recent Takata recall of 5.7 million inflators.

Last year many of these vehicles were recalled for the same problem. This latest recall includes some additional model years and is broken down into what NHTSA is calling “zones.”

Lincoln Joins the Growing List of Takata Recalls

The automaker says the passenger frontal airbags are equipped with inflators that do not contain a drying agent called a desiccate. The ammonium nitrate is more susceptible to moisture intrusion without the drying agent, so all the airbag inflators will be replaced.

This recall is part of a massive new recall, by many automakers, covering 35-40 million vehicles. The Takata problem just continues to grow.

This includes the 2007-2010 MKX, 2006-2011 MKZ, and 2006-2011 Zephyr.

Plaintiffs Say the Cracked Rear Panel Lawsuit is More Than Just Looks

The plaintiffs argue Ford is trying to “redefine” the claims by making the alleged problem less serious than it is, calling the cracks a simple cosmetic problem. Although Ford says there is a “propensity of the applique to crack,” the plaintiffs say there have been dangerous consequences from the cracked rear panels.

Ford trying to argue that it’s just a cosmetic problem is laughable. The cracked rear panels are a mess – they let in moisture that corrodes and expands, frying electrical components and leading to shattered rear windows. Rather than clean it up, Ford just wants to sweep it under the rug using semantics in court.

Class-Action Lawsuit Wants Ford to Do Something About Their Cracked Rear Panel Problem

The affected SUVs named in the cracked tailgate lawsuit are the 2002-2005 Ford Explorer, 2002-2005 Mercury Mountaineer and the 2003-2005 Lincoln Aviator. The lawsuit alleges that even though Ford sold millions of those SUVs, consumers might not have purchased the SUVs if the defect had been known.

The cracked rear panel is a widespread issue in the 1st generation Aviator, as well as the Ford Explorer and Mercury Mountaineer.

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